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Michigan

Michigan’s Children works to ensure that public policies are in the best interest of children from cradle to career, with a focus on reducing disparities caused by economic hardship and structural barriers by race or ethnicity. They build public will and educate and inform policymakers to prioritize the needs of children, youth, and families with the most challenges in their lives. We also support the work of the Michigan Council for Maternal and Child Health, who is advocating for important policy improvements that address Michigan’s high rates of Black maternal and infant mortality.

State Allies:

Michigan Council for Maternal & Child Health • Lansing, MI
Michigan's Children • Lansing, MI
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Top Priorities for 2021

Require that all state department employees and local providers (i.e., health care, education, and child care) who serve and interact with families and young children participate in implicit bias training.

Support state plan to improve maternal and infant outcomes with legislation and appropriations to extend Medicaid coverage for pregnant women to 12 months postpartum and create universal offering of a postpartum check-in to all women and newborn babies.

Fill child care, early intervention, and home visiting workforce shortages with compensation and retention strategies.

Expand home visiting through full utilization of federal funding and require system integration to provide families with options that best meet their goals.

Build and sustain momentum to transform Michigan’s child care system to truly address equity and access issues.

Michigan’s 2020 Early Childhood Policy Landscape and Progress:

$10.69B STATE BUDGET
Estimated FY20 State General Fund Expenditures

UNALIGNED GOVERNMENT
House (R), Senate (R)
Governor (D)

41% LOW-INCOME
423,679 Young Children (0-8) are Below 200% FPL

Even as the state budget shortfalls in both FY20 and FY21 continued to grow, early childhood advocates still had receptive ears in both the Governor’s Office and the legislature. Policymakers said they would make young children a priority before COVID-19 hit, and they made good on their promises.

Though the pandemic stymied efforts, Michigan allies worked together to develop and advance maternal and child health policies that included increased access to home visiting and prenatal care, expanded social/emotional supports for mother and child, intervention services for children, and a focus on racial disparities.

More from Michigan:

Download the full 50-State report.

The Alliance for Early Success 2020 50-State Progress Report on Early Childhood Policy expands state data (disaggregating low-income young children by race) and provides high-level state policy trend analysis for the nation as a whole. Click the icon to download the report.

State Budget Data: National Association of State Budget Officers (NASBO), “Table 4: Fiscal 2020 State General Fund, Estimated (Millions); The Fiscal Survey of the States.” Spring, 2020

Low-Income Data (including disaggregation by race): National Center for Children in Poverty, “NCCP Analysis of ACS 1-year Estimates—Public Use Microdata Sample, 2019.”

State Action Data: Provided by state advocates, October-November 2020, with analysis and synthesis by Frontera Strategy for Alliance for Early Success, “Protecting Progress and Investing in Scale: The 2020 50-State Progress Report on Early Childhood Education Policy.”

Additional State Actions: Mincic, Melissa,  Early Care and Education, State Budget Actions, Fiscal Year 2020. National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), October 2020. 

 

The Alliance for Early Success is achieving large-scale, long-lasting change for the state’s young children by providing our allies with powerful advantages that help them shape Michigan early childhood state policy.

Strategic, Outcomes-Focused Investments

Consulting and Strategy

Technical Support from National Expertise

Rapid Response Support

Connections/Access to Allies in Similar States

Roles in National Communities of Practice