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Food Security Policies

This policy inventory compiles some food security policies that states can choose to put into place to support economic security for families with young children.

Protecting Family Eligibility for Transitional Food Assistance

  • Allowing remaining eligible household members to receive transitional food assistance when a member of a household receiving SNAP benefits has been sanctioned but the household is still receiving benefits.

Example:

Washington

Source:

NCSL: Economic Mobility Enacted Legislation Database

Adjusting SNAP Income and Asset Limits 

  • Setting gross income eligibility limits at 200% FPL and removing asset limits for SNAP

Sixteen states have adopted this policy.

Source:

NCCP: Early Childhood Profiles

Increasing WIC Enrollment Through Targeted Outreach

  • Leveraging data from Medicaid and SNAP to measure enrollment gaps
  • Increasing enrollment using tools to plan, launch, and/or strengthen data matching and targeted outreach to eligible families who are not receiving WIC benefits

Source:

CBPP Toolkit: Increasing WIC Coverage Through Cross-Program Data Matching and Targeted Outreach

Removing Child Support Cooperation Requirements

  • Removing cooperation with child support from requirements for food (and child care) assistance eligibility

Example:

Kansas

Source:

NCSL: Economic Mobility Enacted Legislation Database

Increasing SNAP Flexibility During a Health Pandemic or Other Emergencies

  • Providing emergency benefits supplements
  • Providing benefits for children missing school meals
  • Easing program administrative burdens.

States were allowed a host of SNAP flexibilities during the pandemic and could choose to access any of these flexibilities that the federal government elects to continue.

Source:

CBPP: States Are Using Much-Needed Temporary Flexibility in SNAP to Respond to COVID-19 Challenges